How to use the Windows Magnifier to zoom in on parts of your screen
If you're trying to project your screen at the front of a class, the Windows Magnifier lets people see what you're doing more easily.

Posted by Andy Brown on 29 January 2018

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Using Windows Magnifier to zoom in on part of your screen

When you're training, it can be difficult for delegates on a course to read what you're projecting at the front of the class:

Power BI measure

Power BI Desktop measures can be particularly hard to read!

A way round this is to use the Windows Magnifier:

The Windows magnifier

This tool allows you to zoom in to show parts of the screen more clearly.

 

Using the Magnifier

You can most easily invoke the Magnifier using the Windows key:

Windows key

You can find this key at the bottom left corner of most keyboards. I'm going to call it WinKey from now on.

 

Here's how to start and end use of the Magnifier:

Key What it does
WinKey + = Starts the Magnifier
WinKey + ESC Ends the Magnifier

Here are some useful keys when using the Magnifier:

Key What it does
WinKey + + Zoom in 
WinKey + - Zoom out

You can also zoom in and out using Magnifier by holding down Alt + Ctrl and using the mouse wheel.

Magnifier settings

You can change Magnifier settings by clicking on the settings wheel:

Magnifier settings

Click on the tool at the bottom right of the Magnifier toolbar, or press WinKey + Ctrl + M.

 

Here are some settings you could change:

Changed settings

Here I've set the magnifier to zoom in by 50% at a time, not the default 100%, and I've set the Magnifier toolbar to display as a magnifying glass only so it's less intrusive.

You can also see all of the keyboard shortcuts that you can use at the bottom of the settings window.

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