The July 2017 Power BI Desktop updates, including new table and matrix visuals
Part one of a seven-part series of blogs

This is a bigger update than usual, with the highlight undoubtedly being the official roll-out of the much-trailed new table and matrix visuals.

  1. Updates to Power BI Desktop - July 2017 (this blog)
  2. New table and matrix visuals
  3. Renaming fields - at last!
  4. Incorporating custom visuals within Power BI Desktop
  5. Relative date slicers and filters
  6. Responsive visuals which adapt to your screen size
  7. Breakdown option in waterfall charts

For a cumulative list of all of the updates to Power BI Desktop in the last few months, see this blog.  Our two-day Power BI Desktop course always uses the latest version of the software.

Posted by Andy Brown on 13 July 2017

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Updates to Power BI Desktop - July 2017

A bumper month!  The most significant change by far is that the new table and matrix visuals have finally left preview mode, but there's lots more to get excited about.  Here's a summary:

Change Details
New table and matrix visuals For a fair few months these have been available in preview mode, but they're now official!  Use them to drill down into your data, and much, much more.
Renaming fields At long, long last you can give a column an alias, without having to change the field name in the underlying query.
Custom visuals integration You can now import custom visuals from within Power BI Desktop (the Microsoft store is integrated).
Relative date filters You can now use relative dates in slicers and cards (for example, to show all of the sales in the last 2 weeks).
Responsive visuals When you change the size of visuals, the various component parts resize or hide/display themselves in a sensible way (or at least, that's the theory).
Waterfall chart breakdown You can now analyse the underlying data for a waterfall chart, to see which figures were most responsible for a rise or fall in (eg) sales.

There are other technical updates (you can see a full list, as ever, at the Microsoft Power BI update site), but these are the ones which we think most users will be interested in. 

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