What's new in Excel 2013
Part one of a seven-part series of blogs

Excel 2013 contains radical changes to charts, pivot tables and the user interface. This review explains all the new features of Excel 2013

  1. Excel 2013 - the Wise Owl Review! (this blog)
  2. First Impressions - the Excel 2013 Look-and-Feel
  3. Excel 2013 changes: working with files
  4. Excel 2013 changes: pivot tables and data analysis
  5. Excel 2013 - Changes to Charts
  6. What's new in Excel 2013 - general changes
  7. Excel 2013 - summary and recommendations

Posted by Andy Brown on 30 January 2013

You need a minimum screen resolution of about 700 pixels width to see our blogs. This is because they contain diagrams and tables which would not be viewable easily on a mobile phone or small laptop. Please use a larger tablet, notebook or desktop computer, or change your screen resolution settings.

Excel 2013 - the Wise Owl Review!

It's here!  An independent, knowledgeable review of the latest version of Excel, from a company which has more than 20 years' experience of training in Excel.

In general we love the new Excel, but it does have some strange features, and sadly we haven't got our wish list fulfilled.

What this review includes

There are a lot of new features in Excel 2013, particularly for charts and pivot tables.  I've divided everything up into the following areas:

Area What it covers
Initial impressions First impressions of the new Excel interface.
Working with files Saving, sharing and exporting files, including the new SkyDrive cloud-based storage medium.
Pivot tables and data analysis The many changes in Excel 2013 to do with linking to and analysing data.
Charts Probably the biggest area for changes in Excel 2013: essentially Microsoft have rewritten the way charts work.
General changes Changes to inserting pictures, flash fill, inserting Office apps and other miscellaneous new features in Excel 2013.
Summary and Wise Owl recommendations An independent view on which of the new features will change your life and which will annoy you, and whether it's worth upgrading.

If you want to try Excel 2013 yourself, you can download a free trial copy

Time to get started - let's have a look at the look-and-feel of Excel 2013, and how this has changed.

This blog has 0 threads Add post