Some ideas for how to map data in Power BI Desktop
Part three of a five-part series of blogs

Anyone who has tried to get a meaningful non-US map out of Power BI Desktop will know that it's often not straightforward! This blog shows you how to overcome some of the issues, including geocoding data, getting latitude and longitude settings and changing cross filter settings in relationships.

  1. Techniques for creating maps in Power BI Desktop
  2. Starting the map
  3. Geocoding (setting the correct localisation for data) (this blog)
  4. Obtaining latitude and longitude data
  5. Using latitude and longitude data to create a map

Posted by Andy Brown on 08 June 2017

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Geocoding (setting the correct localisation for data)

To convince Power BI Desktop that regions are in the UK, add a calculated column to the region table:

Localising region

Create a calculated column adding the letters UK onto each region (I'm assuming a similar tactic would work for any other country).

 

You could then use the new UkRegion column as a Location field:

UK region

We're using the UkRegion to identify where sales took place.

 

This gives better results - but they're still wrong:

UK map

At least all sales are taking place in the UK, but the North-West region should be centred over Manchester (as one example).

What's happening is that we're relying on Power BI Desktop to decide where the North-West is.  It would be a better idea to position data exactly, and to do that we'll use the fact that we know the postcode of each shopping centre in which a transaction took place, and from this can derive the latitude and longitude setting.

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