A tutorial on how to create Power View reports based on SSAS tabular models
Part one of a seven-part series of blogs

Power View is an add-in included within Excel 2013 and later versions. This tutorial shows how to create Power View reports based on Analysis Services tabular models.

  1. Overview - what is Power View? (this blog)
  2. Creating your first Power View report
  3. Creating and formatting basic visualisations (tables)
  4. Text boxes and images in Power View
  5. Filtering reports using tiles, slicers and filters
  6. Matrices and cards in Power View
  7. Charts in Power View

This blog is part of our online SSAS Tabular tutorial; we also offer lots of other Analysis Services training resources.

Posted by Andy Brown on 08 December 2015

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Overview - what is Power View?

Power View is an add-in included within Excel 2013 and later versions, which allows you to create reports integrated within Excel workbooks.  Here's an example:

Example Power View report

This report contains a slicer, a matrix and a chart.

Power View reports show up as tabs in the workbook:

Power View report tab

This Power View report is just another tab in the worksheet.


The advantage of Power View is that it allows you - very quickly - to create reports with any layout, combining tables and charts and supporting drill-down. The disadvantage is that the formatting supported is pretty rudimentary (and it seems a bit buggy to me).

So now I've whetted your appetite, let's begin the tutorial proper with a look at how to create your first Power View report!

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